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2002.04.20 =>

irëme serë

Anonymous, in the comments box:

how do you know matt shears?

Well, he's in the program here. And he's dating my next-door neighbor, so I hear him going up and down the stairs a lot. Sometimes I go next door and we all drink cheap wine.

The military, the State Department, and all high-level executives at Fortune 500 companies need to learn the Surinamese language of Trio (via Bellona Times) immediately, and use it henceforth in all reports, briefings, memoranda, etc.

For example, the Trio language contains a so-called frustrative ending. This ending expresses an expectation which has not been met. For example, a civil servant says in Dutch: "I told you that we are going to build a school but it has now transpired that we do not have any money for this." An interpreter translated this into the Trio language but omitted the frustrative ending to the word told. The sentence then gave the impression that when the civil servant made the promise, he already knew that the school would never materialise. Trio leaves no room for doubt. Whoever says: "The man has gone to town," must indicate in the form of the verb whether or not he saw the man going to town. If the speaker was not an eyewitness, he also needs to indicate whether he has understood this to be the case or whether he has indirect evidence.

It's such a bizarre and wonderful idea that on first reading I suspected it was a hoax; it reads like one of the Geegaw lies. But here is the Lord's Prayer in Trio, and these days I think the frustrative might well be appropriate.

 

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